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Bent Out of Shape? — Esther Gokhale, L.Ac., A.B. (AHS14)

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Human beings have bent forward for millenia to reach, gather, and lift. In modern times, bending has become a problematic activity associated with back pain and pathology. Modern ways of bending differ significantly from those observed in non-industrial cultures. Modern guidelines on bending are also very different from traditional patterns. Esther Gokhale presents the merits of hip-hinging, the bending pattern of our ancestors, and shows how it can help us avoid disc damage, ligament laxity, and muscle dysfunction. Using slides from her travels in Africa, India, Israel, and elsewhere, Gokhale will help the audience experience the safety and comfort of a small degree of hip-hinging.

Abstracts and information about the Ancestral Health Symposium can be found at www.ancestralhealth.org/ahs14-program.

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50 Comments

    Popular Comments:

GoodStar . 2020-01-01
36:00 . I think keeping legs externally rotated slightly helps to recruit external rotators of femur and offers better stability.Also they helps to keep the heels together, closer to the midline
I find most people in India standing this way comfortably. Even many walk there with slight external rotation. You can also check Tarahumara tribes' pics also.
https://remezcla.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/195_13-1150x7641-700x465.jpeg?x52261
This idea of keeping feet straight while moving may correct for running but walking per se it is questionable When we try to stand with straight feet, we tend to push the mass towards the forefoot and knee.
121 2 . Reply
Janarae18 . 2019-02-24
Esther’s method has helped me a lot with my back pain
121 2 . Reply
Femke Koene . 2018-07-29
I love this talk especially the bits about continuity - it reminds me of a wonderful book by Jean Liedloff "The continuum concept", a must read for all the westerners out there. Healthy babies, happy Whanau, happy communities.
121 2 . Reply
Sinnergism . 2017-04-10
Fascinating! All her 'recommended guidelines' come completely naturally to me. It's never occurred to me to sit or bend any other way (and it's probably why I've always found old-fashioned or antique furniture so comfortable, and don't even own a 'lounging' type of couch ~ because I find them horribly uncomfortable; even when visiting people I chose a chair, and my back doesn't touch it, because that's what's comfortable). I never imagined my natural way of sitting and bending had 'benefit' in this sense!

On a side-note, I wonder now if this is why I'm so strong...? I find myself asking how anyone who doesn't do what she calls 'hip hinging' lifts any substantial weight -- something with which I've never had any difficulty. Truly fascinating!
121 2 . Reply
ddonie100 Donie Seligson . 2015-10-11
Near the end of this great slide show and explanation is a really helpful "how to" ... she's impressive...most of us have to sit on chairs and some of us have knee problems that are not healed enough to squat (yet!:)
121 2 . Reply
presjo . 2015-09-21
man wish i had come across this before i injured my back. very good presentation.
121 2 . Reply
colonyofcells iamamachine2 . 2014-09-11
Maybe simpler to just stand most of the time, or to squat.
121 2 . Reply
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